Wallabi's Farm: The English Hototogisu Bakery and Farm Blog

Hello, my name is Sara. In 2005 my husband and I bought an old farmhouse in Okayama, borrowed a few fields and set to building ourselves a pleasant rural life. Now, several years on, we have fields a-plenty, what was until the end of 2012 a wheaty bread bakery and is now prepping to be a gluten-free space, and have incorporated our efforts into the Hototogisu Bakery and Farm. Welcome!

Friday, January 06, 2012

Lovely winter sun

Okayama is "hare no kuni" or the land of sunshine. Every now and then I doubt the accuracy of the title, but today I loving the gorgeous sunshine with all my heart. So nice. After a minus five degree Celsius night, the warmth of standing in direct sunshine is wonderful.

So, what do we with the sunshine today? Dry the harvest, of course.

All these lovely beans are destined to become anko, simmered kuromame and miso. I don't care for the first two myself, as it happens, but people who know have told me that the an and kuromame we grow and cook is very, very good. The miso, I do like, and always comes out great, both as plain miso and cooked up into walnut miso or shiso miso. Good stuff!

2 Comments:

At 1:14 PM, Blogger thefukases said...

wow. You guys are good at beans!

We have yet to have large scale success with bean for drying- either the weeds get them, the plants are puny, the beans don't get fat or they all pop open and we lose the beans.

If there are any secrets you can share please do!

I've never tried shiso miso (nice ring to it!) but do you make negi-miso? That stuff rocks!

 
At 1:33 PM, Blogger Sara said...

Beans are tricky! The azuki ripen at different rates, so you either lose quite a bit that split open before and during harvest, or send someone out to gather the ready to split pods before the main harvest. Soybeans are easier, I think, plus you can plant extra and steal some for edamame. We've gone the weed-every-plant-by-hand-and-hoe route (painful but effective), but this year planted far enough apart to use the tilling/hilling machine to do away with the weeds in the rows. Far from perfect but getting better bit by bit, right?

 

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